Our Pillars

High Expectations

Our curriculum promotes the critical thinking, problem solving, writing and technical skills necessary to pursue young dreams.

Individualized Support

We collect scolar achievement data to make informed decisions on the pace and appropriateness of learning plans for every scholar.

More Classroom Time

Our longer school days and longer school year add 259 hours of classroom instruction annually, providing more opportunities for scholar learning and growth.

Teachers as Leaders

We focus on recruiting the best educators and empower them to shape curriculum and school culture.

Parents as Partners

We view parents as partners in their children’s education. Parents receive regular updates on their child’s progress and opportunities to participate both at home and at school.

Safe and Nurturing Community

Our schools are safe and stimulating learning environments. We unite school and community through our Parent Advocacy Committee and after school partnerships.

What Makes Austin Achieve Unique

Rigorous College Readiness

Our high school scholars attend an hour-long college prep class every day. This four-year class series will empower them to enroll, persist, and thrive at the best-fit universities.

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Teaching Beyond the Classroom

Our "whole child" approach includes guidance counseling, restorative justice, and family-based social services. Free after-school programs provide scholars with further opportunities to hone leadership skills and pursue academic excellence.

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Conquering the Digital Divide

Scholars learn two programming languages via daily classes in digital literacy and coding, supported by our 1:1 scholar-to-computer ratio. Our programming curriculum includes Snap!, Python, and Java.

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Restorative Practice

Our Restorative Practice program includes peer-to-peer mentoring, community service, and college and career lunch events to encourage leadership and emotional preparedness. Our zero suspension policy ensures at-risk scholars stay in school.

Are charter schools private schools?

No. Charter schools in Texas are required to adhere to specific enrollment rules and regulations outlined by the Texas Education Agency. Austin Achieve currently serves a broad cross-section of scholars with a variety of academic and social & emotional needs.

Do charter schools "weed out" low performing scholars through discipline or suspensions?

We have a zero suspension program so that our most struggling scholars stay in school at all times. With this program, we ensure all scholars have access to the academic and emotional supports they need to stay in school at Austin Achieve.

Do charter schools offer special education programs?

Yes. In fact, 13% of scholars at Austin Achieve receive special education services. This is a higher percentage of special education scholars than in the Austin Independent School District.

Are failing charter schools allowed to continue to operate?

No. Charter schools are required to adhere to the public school accountability system and are held to higher standards than traditional public schools. If a charter school receives a negative accountability rating for three consecutive years, the school will be subject to closure. Traditional public schools are not subject to this “three strikes, you’re out” rule.

Do charter schools want to remove the need for traditional public schools?

No. At Austin Achieve, we recognize that some traditional public schools do not meet the needs of all scholars. Charter schools exist to provide those scholars alternatives, and also create competition with surrounding schools.

Why do we need charter schools? How do charter schools increase the quality of education?

The larger goal is for all schools to be high-performing, and when charters share their innovation and best practices, it helps foster education reform which benefits all scholars no matter which school they attend.

Some people say charter schools divert funds from regular public schools. Is this true?

Charter schools receive state and federal funding based on the number of scholars enrolled at the school, and public funding follows each scholar. If a scholar is enrolled at a charter school, public funds flow to the charter. However, charter schools in Texas receive $1,400 less per scholar per year than traditional public schools.

Do charter schools pay their teachers less than traditional public schools?

We are proud to say we pay our teachers nearly 10% more than traditional schools in our area and provide paid maternity leave, an on-site daycare, and a variety of other benefits that aren’t found at other traditional or charter schools.

What is a Charter School?

Charter schools in Texas are part of the public school system. When the Texas Education Agency authorizes a charter, the agency is effectively creating a smaller, more nimble independent school district. For context: Austin Achieve will grow to serve over 2,000 scholars by 2020. By comparison, the Austin Independent School District currently serves over 80,000 children.

Scholars & Families

Are charter schools private schools?

No. Charter schools in Texas are required to adhere to specific enrollment rules and regulations outlined by the Texas Education Agency. Austin Achieve currently serves a broad cross-section of scholars with a variety of academic and social & emotional needs.

Do charter schools "weed out" low performing scholars through discipline or suspensions?

We have a zero suspension program so that our most struggling scholars stay in school at all times. With this program, we ensure all scholars have access to the academic and emotional supports they need to stay in school at Austin Achieve.

Do charter schools offer special education programs?

Yes. In fact, 13% of scholars at Austin Achieve receive special education services. This is a higher percentage of special education scholars than in the Austin Independent School District.

Operation & Structure

Are failing charter schools allowed to continue to operate?

No. Charter schools are required to adhere to the public school accountability system and are held to higher standards than traditional public schools. If a charter school receives a negative accountability rating for three consecutive years, the school will be subject to closure. Traditional public schools are not subject to this “three strikes, you’re out” rule.

Do charter schools want to remove the need for traditional public schools?

No. At Austin Achieve, we recognize that some traditional public schools do not meet the needs of all scholars. Charter schools exist to provide those scholars alternatives, and also create competition with surrounding schools.

Why do we need charter schools? How do charter schools increase the quality of education?

The larger goal is for all schools to be high-performing, and when charters share their innovation and best practices, it helps foster education reform which benefits all scholars no matter which school they attend.

Funding

Some people say charter schools divert funds from regular public schools. Is this true?

Charter schools receive state and federal funding based on the number of scholars enrolled at the school, and public funding follows each scholar. If a scholar is enrolled at a charter school, public funds flow to the charter. However, charter schools in Texas receive $1,400 less per scholar per year than traditional public schools.

Do charter schools pay their teachers less than traditional public schools?

We are proud to say we pay our teachers nearly 10% more than traditional schools in our area and provide paid maternity leave, an on-site daycare, and a variety of other benefits that aren’t found at other traditional or charter schools.

Board of Directors

The Austin Achieve Board of Directors is the steward of our mission, vision and goals. Dedicated to strategic growth, the board provides leadership and guidance to ensure Austin Achieve continues to thrive as a premier charter campus.

  • Andy Greenawalt

    Board Chair

  • Amanda Berger

    Vice Chair

  • James Nortey

    Secretary

  • Eloisa Acha

  • Kathrin Brewer

  • Jack Cardwell

  • G. Nelson Crowe, III

  • Cooper Drenner

  • Jaime Garcia

  • Christopher Harte

  • Temp Keller

  • Jonathan Pearce

  • Paul Schappert

  • Catherine P. Thompson

  • Steve Clark

    Board Member Emeritus

  • Sterling Lands, II

    Board Member Emeritus

  • Bruce Todd

    Board Member Emeritus

  • Laurence G. Walker

    Legacy Member

Shared Services Team

  • John Armbrust

    Executive Director and Founder

  • Emily Morrison

    Director of Development

  • Tyler Heath

    Director of Operations

  • Lizett Ternes

    Family Engagement Manager

  • Erin Buthman

    Development Associate

  • Jessica Perez

    Marketing & Communications Associate